Syllabus: Fall, 2002

GER 389K: Introduction to Scholarship

Course Designed by J. Swaffar and K. Arens


**= required
*= recommended; at least skim
<unmarked> = good idea to skim or read
•• = assignments


Week 1: August 29
Thurs
Introduction to the Course: The Profession, Professional Standards, Surviving

PART I: What is the Profession? What Is My Place In It?

Week 2: September 3 & 5
Tues
Institutional Configuration
**
David Benseler et al., eds. Teaching German in Twentieth-Century America, all (passim)
**German Quarterly, Millennial Issue, 73, #1 (Winter 2000)
**Graff, "The Scholar in Society," Introduction to Scholarship (II), 343-362
*Gleckner, "A Taxonomy of Colleges and Universities," Academic's Handbook, 3-16
*Schuman, "Small is . . . Different," Academic's Handbook, 17-28
*Burian, "On Being a Political Animal in the Academic Zoo," Academic's Handbook
*Pye, "University Governance," Academic's Handbook, 297-314
*Colton, "The Role of the Department in the Groves of Academe," Academic's Handbook, 315-333
*Stewart, "The Academic Community," Academic's Handbook, 334-340
*PMLA: Report on the Conference on the Future of Doctoral Education, 115, #5 (October 2000): 1136-1276 (copy -- includes three short other articles from the issue on publishing and teaching)
••ASSIGNMENT: What are the institutional challenges facing German Studies? List at least three, and explain why; may be collected.

Thurs The Career **Academic's Handbook, Part III: Academic Employment, 113-178
*Goodwin, "Fads and Fashions on Campus: Interdisciplinarity and Internationalization," Academic's Handbook, 73-80
*Budd, "On Writing Scholarly Articles," Academic's Handbook, 249-262
*Lucas and Murry, New Faculty: A Practical Guide for Academic Beginners, passim
*Goldschmithe et al., The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career, passim
Germano, Getting it Published, passim
Vesilind, "The Responsible Conduct of Academic Research," Academic's Handbook, 104-111
Rowson, "The Scholar and the Art of Publishing," 273-285
Campbell, "Effects of the Networked Environment on Publishing and Scholarship," Academic's Handbook, 286-296
Urgo, "The Affiliation Blues" (copy: excerpts from Symploke)
Terry Caesar, "Affiliation in a Career of Specialization" (copy: excerpts from Symploke
Di Leo, "On Being and Becoming Affiliated" (copy: excerpts from Symploke


Week 3: September 10 & 12

Tues Working Smart: An Introduction to the Fields
See Handouts in Assignment Handout
-vita, grants, reading lists, theory bibliography
-assignment structure for rest of semester
••ASSIGNMENT DUE: first draft of CV (see assignment instructions)

SECTION II: The Fields -- What Can Be Researched and Taught, and Where

Thurs LINGUISTICS, PHILOLOGY
**Lehmann, "Linguistics," Introduction to Scholarship (I), 1-28
**Finegan, "Linguistics," Introduction to Scholarship (II), 3-27
**Baron, "Language, Culture, and Society," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 28-52
••ASSIGNMENT: Explain the "classical" role and projects of the study of linguistics in departments, and list/explain at least three ways that they have changed in the 10 years between the two editions of the textbooks (may be collected).


Week 4: September 17 & 19

Tues The How-To: Structural Existence
•Professional Organizations:
-Linguistic Society of America
-Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL)
-Modern Language Association
-North American Society for the History of the Language Sciences

•Bibliographies:
-Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts
-Linguistic Bibliography for the Year
-Bibliographie Linguistischer Literatur
-MLA International Bibliography
-Dissertation Abstracts International

•Journals:
-Language (from the LSA)
-Journal of Germanic Linguistics (from SGL)
-Discourse and Society
-Discourse Studies

•Meetings:
-LSA: just after New Year's
-Germanic Linguistics Annual Conference : April
-NAHoLS/ICHolS: every two years; international
-MLA (comparatively few linguistics sections): Dec. 27-30

••ASSIGNMENT:
1) Go look at issues of at least two of the journals listed above (and note that there may be a "program edition" or a "call for papers" for the annual conventions in some of them); try out at least one of the on-line bibliographies, and see what trouble you have using it, or limits you discover.
2) Have prepared at least three questions about what you think are research difficulties or issues, dominant trends, professional issues, desirable foci. They may have the form "I get the impression that X is what's going on; yes or no?"
These may be collected.

Thurs ••PRACTICUM: LINGUISTICS BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENT DRAFT DUE


Week 5: September 24 & 26

Tues APPLIED LINGUISTICS, COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC, TEACHING/PEDAGOGY
**Byrnes, ed. Learning Foreign and Second Languages, 1(rec. 262-95)
**Lunsford, "Rhetoric and Composition," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 77-100<
*Modern Language Journal: Special Issues: A Century of Language Teaching and Research, Parts ! & 2 = Vol. 84, #4 (Winter 2000) and Vol. 85. #1 (Spring, 2001) (copies)
Kramsch, "Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, and the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Modern Language Journal, 84, #3 (Fall 2000): 311-26 (copy)
••ASSIGNMENT: Explain where applied linguistics and composition studies fits into departments, especially with respect to linguistics/philology and area studies. (May be collected)

Thurs The How-To: Structural Existence •Professional Organizations:
-American Association for Teachers of German
-American Association for Applied Linguistics
-American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages
-Council on College Composition and Communication
-TESOL
-Modern Language Association

•Bibliographies:
-Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts
-MLA Bibliography<
- Annual Review of Applied Linguistics
-International Review of Applied Linguistics
-Reading Research Quarterly
-ERIC
-Education Index
-PsychLit
-Dissertation Abstracts International

•Journals:
-TESOL Quarterly
-Modern Language Journal
-Studies in Second Language Acquisition
-FLAnnals
-Unterrichtspraxis (its equivalents are Hispania and French Studies)

•Meetings:
-ACTFL: November
-AATG: usually November
-CCCC: late spring

••ASSIGNMENT:
1) Go look at issues of at least two of the journals listed above (and note that there may be a "program edition" or a "call for papers" for the annual conventions in some of them); try out at least one of the on-line bibliographies, and see what trouble you have using it, or limits you discover.
2) Have prepared at least three questions about what you think are research difficulties or issues, dominant trends, professional issues, desirable foci. They may have the form "I get the impression that X is what's going on; yes or no?"
These may be collected.


Week 6: October 1 & 3

Tues **PRACTICUM: APPLIED LINGUISTICS BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENT DUE

Thurs LITERARY STUDIES: CLASSICAL AND CANONICAL
**Lipking, "Literary Criticism," Introduction to Scholarship (I), 79-97
**Hernandi, "Literary Theory," Introduction to Scholarship (I), 98-115
**Scholes, "Canonicity and Textuality," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 138-158
**Marshall, Literary Interpretation," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 159-182
**Culler, "Literary Theory," Introduction to Scholarship (II), 201-235
*PMLA: Special Millennium Issue, 115, # 7(December 2000) --SKIM!!
••ASSIGNMENT: Explain the "classical" role and projects of the study of literature in departments, and list/explain at least three ways that they have changed in the 10 years between the two editions of the textbooks (may be collected).


Week 7: October 8 & 10

Tues The How-To: Structural Existence
•Journals:
-Monatshefte
-German Quarterly
-Germanic Review
-Modern Austrian Literature
-German Studies Review

•Bibliographies:
-Modern Language Association
- H. V. Eppelsheimer and C. Kottelwesch, eds. Bibliographie der deutschen (Sprach- und) Literaturwissenschaft
-Germanistik: Internationales Referatenorgan mit bibliographischen Hinweisen
-The Year's Work in Modern Language Studies
-Biblio-Data <http://www.cas.org/ONLINE/DBSS/bibliodatass.html>
-FRANCIS
-Arts and Humanities Index
-OCLC
-Books in Print/Verzeichnis lieferbarer Bücher

•Professional Organizations:<
-Modern Language Association
-German Studies Association
-American Association of Teachers of German
-Scandinavian Studies Association
-Women in German
NOTE: almost every period, major scholar, or movement has its own specialty organization, with its own journal -- see list at back of September PMLA of "allied organizations" for partial listing, and dept. website

•Meetings:
-GSA: October
-Medieval Studies Association: in Kalamazoo, each spring
-AATG: November
-Scandinavian Studies Association: Apri
MLA: 27-30 December

-REGIONAL MLAs:
-South Central MLA (TEXAS): October
-South Atlantic MLA
-Rocky Mountain MLA
-Midwest MLA
-Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
-Northeast MLA

••ASSIGNMENT:
1) Go look at issues of at least two of the journals listed above (and note that there may be a "program edition" or a "call for papers" for the annual conventions in some of them); try out at least one of the on-line bibliographies, and see what trouble you have using it, or limits you discover.
2) Have prepared at least three questions about what you think are research difficulties or issues, dominant trends, professional issues, desirable foci. They may have the form "I get the impression that X is what's going on; yes or no?"
These may be collected.

Thurs **PRACTICUM: LITERARY STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENT DUE


Week 8: October 15 & 17

Tues HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL STUDIES:
NEW LITERARY SCHOLARSHIP (or packaging of it)
**Tanselle, "Textual Scholarship," Introduction to Scholarship (I), 29-52
**Greetham, "Textual Scholarship," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 103-137
**Lewalski, "Historical Scholarhip," Introduction to Scholarship (I), 53-78
**Patterson, "Historical Scholarship," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 183-200
**Schor, "Feminist and Gender Studies, Intro. to Scholarship (II), 262-287


**Gates, "'Ethnic and Minority' Studies," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 288-302
**Allen, "'Border' Studies," Introduction to Scholarship (II), 303-319
••ASSIGNMENT: Explain how historical and textual scholarship used to be integrated into departments, and what the addition of newer fields of humanistic scholarship do to the areas (as you saw them in last week's readings). List/explain/speculate about at least three ways that they have changed departments and will change them in the future (may be collected).

Thurs CROSSING DISCIPLINES AND LANGUAGES
**Bathric, "Cultural Studies," Introduction to Scholarship (II), 320-340
**Gunn, "Interdisciplinary Studies," Intro. to Scholarship (II), 239-261
**Denham, et. al, eds. A User's Guide to German Cultural Studies:
-Teraoka, "Multiculturalism and the Study of German Literature," 63-78
-Bammer, "Interrogating Germanness," 31-44
-Crew, "Who's Afraid of Cultural Studies," 45-61
-Kacandes, "German Cultural Studies," 3-28
-Chapter 32: Selected Annotated bibliographies, 529-536
*PMLA Forum on Interdisciplinary Studies, 111, # 2 (March 1996) (copy)
*Lefevere, Translating Literature (translation as particularly suitable as an approach for small languages)


Week 9: October 22 & 24

Tues The How-To: Structural Existence
•Journals:
-German Politics and Society<
-German Studies Review
-New German Critique
-Argument

-NOTE: area studies journals are in OTHER disciplines, not German; e.g
Hypatia (women and philosophy)
American Imago (psychoanalytic approaches to culture and lit.)
Central European History
Wide Angle
(film studies)
Signs (feminism)
Comparative Literature

•Bibliographies:
-Historical Abstracts
-Nexis/Lexis<
-Philosopher's Index
-Arts and Humanities Index
-ArtsIndex
-FRANCIS

•Professional Organizations:
-Modern Language Association
-German Studies Association
-American Association of Teachers of German
-Scandinavian Studies Association
-Netherlandic Studies Association
-League for Yiddish

•Meetings:
-GSA: October
-Kalamazoo: Medieval Studies
-Scandinavian Studies Association: April

••ASSIGNMENT:
1) Go look at issues of at least two of the journals listed above (and note that there may be a "program edition" or a "call for papers" for the annual conventions in some of them); try out at least one of the on-line bibliographies, and see what trouble you have using it, or limits you discover.
2) Have prepared at least three questions about what you think are research difficulties or issues, dominant trends, professional issues, desirable foci. They may have the form "I get the impression that X is what's going on; yes or no?"
These may be collected.

Thurs **PRACTICUM: CULTURAL STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENT DUE


Week 10: October 29 & 31

Tues From research to professional writing and activities
Class Discussion:
-surviving the profession
-how to do a précis: an introduction to theory
••CV Assignment, Part II due (see assignment instructions)
••Bibliography take-home test passed out


SECTION III: THEORY AS BASIS FOR SETTING UP ARGUMENTATION
--INTRODUCTION TO SCHOLARLY ANALYSIS AND WRITING
**NOTE:
Page references with no further identification are from Adams and Searle, eds. Critical Theory Since 1965;
"copy" is on reserve in Schoch Reading Gallery;
all interpretation assignments use Kleist's Bettelweib von Locarno/Beggarwoman from Locarno, which you have in a handout (or a story of your choice, if you are not in German).

Thurs Geistesgeschichte and Positivism
Positivism
**Wilhelm Scherer, "H. Hettner's Literaturgeschichte" (copy = Zmegac, Methoden)
---, "Zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache" (copy = Zmegac, Methoden)
--- , "Die neue Generation" (copy = Zmegac, Methoden)
*Manon Maren-Griesebach, "Positivistische Methode" (copy)
Klaus Laermann, "Was ist literaturwissenschaftlichicher Positivismus" (copy = Zmegac, Kritik)
•non-German readers: Gervinus, "Intro. to the History of the 19th C." (copy)
Ranke, "On the Epochs of Modern History," and "Preface" (copy)

Geistesgeschichte
**H. A. Korff, "Goethezeit und Ideengeschichte" (copy)
*Manon Maren-Griesebach, "Geistesgeschichtliche Methode" (copy)
*Rudolf Unger, "Literaturgeschichte und Geistesgeschichte" (copy = Zmegac, Methoden)
Emil Staiger, "Von der Aufgabe und den Gegenständen der Literaturwissenschaft" (copy = Zmegac, Methoden)
Karl Riha, "Literaturwissenschaft als Geistesgeschichte" (copy = Zmegac, Kritik)
Wilhelm Dilthey, "Allgemeine Sätze über den Zusammenhang der Geisteswissenschaften" (copy)
•non-German readers: Droysen, "Outline of the Principles of History" (copy)
Burckhardt, "On Fortune and Meaning in History" (copy)
Dilthey, "Patterns and Meaning in History" (copy)
••ASSIGNMENT: define the data, method, and goals of each school of interpretation (e.g., what it looks at, how, and why)


Week 11: November 5 & 7

Tues Class project: sample interpretations in each school's style
*see Staiger on "Bettelweib" (copy)
>••ASSIGNMENT: Precis due (see handout: 1 essay + interp. of "Bettelweib")

Thurs Text-Intrinsic Criticism, or "strong reading" (New Criticism, Formalism, and Phenomenology/Hermeneutics)
New Criticism
**W.K. Wimsatt & Monroe C. Beardsley, "The Intentional Fallacy," "The Affective Fallacy," (Adams, ed., copy, 944-959)
T.S. Eliot, "Tradition and the Individual Talent" (Adams, ed., copy, 760-766)

Phenomenology
*Martin Heidegger, "Hölderlin and the Essence of Poetry," 757-765
Roman Ingarden, "Phenomenological Aesthetics," 184-197
Edmund Husserl, "Phenomenology," 657-663
Manon Maren-Griesebach, "Phenomenologische Methode" (copy)

Formalism and Prague School
**Jan Mukarovsky, "Standard Language and Poetic Language," (Adams, ed., copy, 975-982)
Boris Eichenbaum, "Theory of the 'Formal Method'," (Adams, ed., copy, 800-816)
Mikhail M. Bakhtin, "Discourse in the Novel," 664-678
••ASSIGNMENT: define the data, method, and goals of each school of interpretation (e.g., what it looks at, how, and why)


Week 12: November 12 & 14

Tues Class project: sample interpretations in each school's style
••ASSIGNMENT: Precis due (see handout: 1 essay + interp. of "Bettelweib")

Thurs Linguistic Approaches (Speech Act, Structuralism/Semiotics)
Linguistics
**Ferdinand de Saussure, "Course in General Linguistics," 645-656
Benjamin Lee Whorf, "The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language," 709-723
Noam Chomsky, "Aspects of the Theory of Syntax," 37-58
* --- , "Managua Lectures 1 & 2" (copy)

Speech Act Theory
**J.L. Austin, "How to Do Things with Words," 832-838
John R. Searle, "What Is a Speech Act?," 59-69

Structuralism/Semiotics
*Y. Lotman & B.A. Uspensky, "On the Semiotic Mechanism of Culture," 408-422
Claude Lévi-Strauss, "The Structural Study of Myth," 808-822
••ASSIGNMENT: define the data, method, and goals of each school of interpretation (e.g., especially how a linguistic theory prescribes a text analysis)


Week 13: November 19 & 21

Tues Class project: sample interpretations in each school's style
*see Arens on "Bettelweib" (copy)
••ASSIGNMENT: Precis due (see handout: 1 essay + interp. of "Bettelweib")

Thurs *THANKSGIVING


Week 14: November 26 & 328

Tues Marxist-Derived Criticisms (Reception Theory through Poststructuralism, Deconstruction, and the Yale Critics)
Frankfurt School and other Marxisms
**Walter Benjamin, "Theses on the Philosophy of History," 679-685
Georg Lukács, "Art and Objective Truth," 789-807
Theodor Adorno, "Aesthetic Theory," 231-237
Max Horkheimer, "The Social Function of Philosophy," 686-696
Louis Althusser, "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses," 238-250
SED, "Aktuelle Aufgaben der Germanistik" (Zmegac, Methoden)

Reception Theory
**Hans Robert Jauss, "Paradigmawechsel in der Literaturwissenschaft" (Zmegac, Methoden)
Hans Robert Jauss, "Literary History as a Challenge to L. Theory," 163-183
Wolfgang Iser, "The Repertoire," 359-380

Post-Structuralism and Deconstruction
Jacques Derrida, "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences," "Of Grammatology,","Difference," 79-136
Michel Foucault, "What is an Author?," "Discourse on Language," 137-162
Geoffrey H. Hartman, "Literary Commentary as Literature," 344-358
J. Hillis Miller, "The Critic as Host," 450-468
••ASSIGNMENT: define the data, method, and goals of each school of interpretation (e.g., what it looks at, how, and why)

Thurs Class project: sample interpretations in each school's style
••ASSIGNMENT: Precis due (see handout: 1 essay + interp. of "Bettelweib")


Week 15: December 3 & 5

Tues On Identity Construction (personal, national, marginal, feminist)
Psychoanalytic Criticism
**Jacques Lacan, "The Mirror Stage," "The Agency of the Letter," 733-756
Sigmund Freud, "Creative Writers and Daydreaming" (Adams, ed., copy, 711-716)
Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari, "Anti-Oedipus," 283-307

Post-Colonial and National-Identity Criticism
**Homi K. Bhabha, "DissemiNation" (copy)
Edward W. Said, "Secular Criticism," 604-622
Reingard Nethersole, "Models of Globalization" (copy)

Feminisms
*Sandra M. Gilbert, "Literary Paternity," 485-496
Lillian S. Robinson, "Treason Our Text," 571-582
*Hélène Cixous, "The Laugh of the Medusa," 308-320
Julia Kristeva, "Women's Time," 469-484
••ASSIGNMENT: define the data, method, and goals of each school of interpretation (e.g., what kind of identity it looks at, how, and why)

Thurs Class project: sample interpretations in each school's style
••ASSIGNMENT: Precis due (see handout: 1 essay + interp. of "Bettelweib")


FINAL EXAMINATION: as on official schedule--may be written on computer
••CV Assignment, Part III due (see assignment instructions)


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